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    How Can We Deal With Emotions in Today’s Market?


    Here are the emotions buyers and sellers should anticipate experiencing.

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    Buying and selling real estate is nothing short of an emotional rollercoaster, and it’s always best to be honest about that. When people try to pretend they aren’t feeling a certain emotion, it usually never ends well.

    At the start, buying a home will be a super exciting experience. You’ll be browsing online for that dream home as you envision a whole new chapter of your life. However, as your agent, I’ll be the one to break it to you that your first home likely won’t be your dream home, but rather your stepping stone.

    When you start the pre-approval process as a buyer, there’s a good chance you’ll be greeted with the reality that your money isn’t going to carry you as far as you thought it would. That’s okay, though; we’ll get you there on your next purchase.

    You might get your heart broken in a bidding war since competition among buyers is fierce right now; low inventory and fantastic interest rates mean a lot of homes are selling quickly with multiple offers. You’ll be buzzing as you write your offer and put together a letter for the seller in the hopes of making a good impression, but unfortunately, you may simply get outbid by the next person.

    Here’s what I can tell you, though: Everything happens for a reason. You might get outbid on your first, second, or even fifth offer, but eventually you’ll win out on a great home for you and your family—that home was always the one for you.

     

    “It may not always be sunshine and rainbows,
    but I promise you that we’ll get you through it.”

     

    Also, it’s normal to feel overwhelmed by the paperwork that your agent and lender send you. You’ll probably feel frustrated with your lender because they’ll keep asking you for more and more information, but remember that they’re just doing their job diligently. After that, you’ll have to wait for the appraiser, who will come out to tell you whether you’re overpaying for the home; you’ll be on pins and needles.

    Then comes the inspection, which could be when you learn that the home you want so badly has some serious issues. If issues are found, the struggle then becomes negotiating fixes with the seller. It may not always be sunshine and rainbows, but I promise you that we’ll get you through it.

    Let’s address some emotional realities on the selling side of things. Sometimes, people have to sell their homes for practical reasons—it’s not always about upgrading to something better. If you have to move out of the area and leave your dream home behind, it won’t be as easy as you hope.

    We’ll ask you to clean and declutter your home so we can take stellar photos, and that process will entail a lot of work. Sorting all of your belongings, cleaning up messes, and anticipating showings can be exhausting, especially if you have kids (toys seem to multiply and find their way into every room in the house). Yes, it’s chaotic, but near the end of it all, you’ll see how it was all worth it.

    The truth is, you’ll quickly grow tired of showings because hopefully, I’m doing my job by bringing in people non-stop. Once we start receiving offers, we’ll have to determine who the best buyer for your home is. You’ll find yourself getting emotionally attached to some buyers because they went through the trouble of writing you that lovely letter all about their family. However, when the inspector comes and picks your home apart, those perfect buyers may leave you in the dust or ask you for tons of credits and repairs.

    It’s easy to be upset by strangers demanding that you address “issues” in the home that’s served you and your family so well for years. At this point, however, we do have to put the emotions aside and try to think of it as strictly a transaction.

    Like I said, we’ll see you through; I often tell people that my job as a Realtor sometimes means I have to be a therapist, too. That’s because I care about my clients and want to help them weather the ups and downs of real estate. If you have questions about this or any other topic, please reach out to me via phone or email. I’m always here to help.

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